The NBA finals are over.

The start of football is a month away.

Sure, there’s MLB baseball — if you’re into that sort of thing.

But for we sport-lovin’ Southerners, the Olympics are sure to provide a much-needed booster shot (PSA: get vaccinated) of on-screen athletic competition, tragedy and triumph, to get us between seasons.

Luckily for us, there are as many Southerners representing the U-S-of-A as there were artists on Master P’s No Limit Records in the late 1990s. And like No Limit, we’re sure to see some hits and quite a few bombs. And maybe, just maybe, there’ll be the rare Silkk-y smooth competitor who shocks the world and gives America a new national hero.

Over the next couple of weeks, Reckon will introduce you to several Southern Olympians who are set to compete in Tokyo.

Alas, Devin Booker and Khris Middleton — of Mississippi and South Carolina, respectively — will just have to settle for Western Conference and NBA championship titles, respectively.

We’re mainly focused on the underdogs.

On your mark … get set … and  visit Reckon’s Instagram to see all our Southern Olympians.

First up: Meet Norfolk, Virginia’s Keyshawn Davis

Keyshawn Davis of the USA celebrates victory over Richman Ashelley (not pictured) after the Lightweight Fight between Keyshawn Davis and Richman Ashelley at The Rotunda at Caesars Palace on April 03, 2021 in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. (Photo by Francois Nel/Getty Images)

ESPN says Davis is “likely the top men’s candidate for a gold medal” on the U.S. boxing team, but he almost wasn’t eligible. Davis, 22, at first qualified for the men’s boxing team, but was disqualified (he learned on Christmas Eve) when he went pro after the delay of the Tokyo games. As a pro, he won his first three fights, and delayed his fourth fight when he learned he could re-qualify for the Olympics. “I honestly couldn’t believe it,” he told Norfolk’s WAVY about his opportunity to rejoin the team. 

“I was happy with my decision. I was a happy fighter,” he told ESPN about his decision to go pro. “But when the Olympics came back to me, it was a no-brainer to go back.” 

He added: “Nobody in the entire world never went through the things we’re about to go through. If we come out, when we come out on top, winning that gold medal, that’s going to be something to remember literally for the rest of your life because we’re living in a pandemic and we won a gold medal through a pandemic.” “They should expect nothing but a gold medal from me.”