Rachel Pearson founded women’s economic policy organization Engage, www.engagewomen.org, after working for years in Washington, D.C., and growing frustrated at the lack of bipartisanship in Congress.

“Women outlive, outnumber and out vote men,” Pearson said. “The political power should be ours, and we should have a much larger impact on legislative outcomes.”

Workplace disparities, particularly for women of color, she said, are holding women back from achieving the economic security and success enjoyed by their male counterparts.

Engage recently published data highlighting opportunities for bipartisan solutions to policy challenges affecting women. Pearson believes most solutions, such as improved paid family leave policies or better broadband internet access, are inherently bipartisan.

“We allow ourselves to be divided on these issues,” she said. “But we need to drive the change together so women can live equal and economically secure lives.”

Reckon asked Pearson what she’s currently reading, watching and listening to in order to achieve those goals.

What Rachel is reading: “The Weekend edition of the Financial Times and WSJ and all their culture content and reviews. I love Peggy Noonan’s Saturday column in the WSJ.”

What Rachel is watching: “Of course, Bridgerton. The Duke of Hastings led me to For the People, another Shonda Rhimes show that got only one season, but I think deserved more.”

What Rachel is listening to: “I’m listening to Pivot, Kara Swisher and Scott Galloway’s podcast. I don’t always agree with their politics, however I learn so much from their conversations about tech and business generally.

Musically, “Leave the door open” by Anderson Paak, Bruno Mars, and Silk Sonic.

Best piece of advice or a tip?

“Talk to people who disagree with you. Put yourself in the other person’s shoes as it relates to their position. Find your common ground.”